Head of Department: Mrs A Glencorse | aglencorse@scissett.com

"Believing and belonging"

The RE course on offer at Scissett Middle School has been designed to reflect three key areas. It includes a study of the key beliefs and practices of religions and other world views, including those represented in West Yorkshire. It provides opportunities to explore key religious concepts and common human questions of meaning, purpose and value, ‘ultimate questions’. It enables pupils to investigate how beliefs affect moral decisions and identity, exploring both diversity and shared human values.  

Click here to see how British Moral Values are taught in this subject.


Aims

The aims are taken from the guidance provided in the agreed Syllabus for Religious Education in Calderdale, Kirklees and Leeds 2019-2024.

The syllabus requires all pupils to:

A Investigate the beliefs and practices of religions and other world views, including:
  Beliefs and authority: core beliefs and concepts; sources of authority including written traditions and leaders;
  Worship and Spirituality: how individuals and communities express belief, commitment and emotion.
B Investigate how religions and other world views address questions of meaning, purpose and value, including:
  The nature of religion and belief and its key concepts;
  Ultimate Questions of belonging, meaning, purpose and truth.
C Investigate how religions and other world views influence morality, identity and diversity, including:
  Moral decisions: teachings of religions and world views on moral and ethical questions; evaluation, reflection and critical responses;
  Identity and Diversity: diversity among and within religions and other world views: individual and community responses to difference and shared human values.

Key Stage 2

The Agreed Syllabus specifies that pupils should extend their knowledge and understanding of religions, beliefs and values, recognising personal, local, national and global contexts. They should be introduced to an extended range of sources and subject specific vocabulary. They should be encouraged to be curious and to ask and discuss increasingly challenging questions about beliefs, values and human life, drawing on insights of religions and other world views. Pupils should respond with their own ideas, identifying relevant information, selecting examples and giving reasons to support their ideas and views.

At KS2, teaching and learning should build on KS1 focus around Christianity and Islam, and be extended to the study of Judaism and Sikhism, alongside developing understanding of non-religious approaches to life. Aspects of other faiths may be included as appropriate.

As part of investigating the beliefs and practices of religions and other world views, pupils should be taught to:

  • Describe and understand links between stories and other aspects of the communities they are investigating, responding thoughtfully to beliefs and teachings that arise from them;
  • Describe and make connections between different features of the religions and other world views, discovering more about prayer, celebrations, worship, pilgrimages and rituals that mark important points in life.

As part of investigating how religions and other world views address questions of meaning, purpose and value, pupils should be taught to:

  • Observe and understand varied examples of religions and other world views so they can explain, with reasons, their meanings and significance for the choices made by individuals and communities;
  • Discuss and present thoughtfully their own and others’ views on challenging questions about belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, applying ideas of their own in different forms.

As part of investigating how religions and other world views influence morality, identity and diversity, pupils should be taught to:

  • Discuss and respond to ethical questions, including what is right, wrong, just and fair and the complexity of these questions;
  • Consider and apply ideas about ways in which diverse communities can live together for the wellbeing of all. Responding thoughtfully to ideas about community, values and respect.
     

Key Stage 3

Students should expend and deepen their knowledge and understanding of a range of religions and other world views, studying these systematically and recognising their personal, local, national and global context. They should draw on a wide range of subject specific language confidently and flexibly, learning to use the concepts of religious study. They should understand how religions and beliefs influence the values and lives of individuals and groups and how they have an impact on wider issues. They should be able to appraise the practices and beliefs they study with increasing discernment based on analysis, interpretation and evaluation, developing their capacity to articulate well-reasoned positions.

At KS3, students extend their study to include Buddhism and Hinduism.  They build on their knowledge of Christianity and the other three major world faiths, as well as developing understanding on non-religious world views. There should be recognition of other belief systems and practices and understanding of diversity within religions.

As part of knowing about and understanding a range of religions and other world views, pupils should be taught to:

  • Explain and interpret a range of beliefs, teachings and sources of wisdom and authority, including experience, in order to understand religions and other world views as coherent systems or ways of seeing the world;
  • Explain how and why individuals and communities express their beliefs and values in many different ways, enquiring into this variety and the links between them.

As part of exploring questions of beliefs and meaning, pupils should be taught to:

  • Explore some ultimate questions that are raised by human life, making well-informed and reasoned personal responses and expressing insights on a wide range of examples;
  • Consider, analyse and evaluate a range of approaches to questions of beliefs and meaning using some introductory theological approaches.

As part of investigating questions about morality and diversity, pupils should be taught to:

  • Explore and express insights into significant moral and ethical questions and reflect personal responses, drawing on a range of examples;
  • Observe and interpret a wide range of ways in which commitment and identity are expressed, accounting for the impact of diversity within and between communities.

Key Documents

Assessment in Religious Education

Knowledge and Understanding of Religion

 

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